Bunny Find Your Hoppy: A disguised bunny password book

bunny password book

bunny password book

The bunny password book that can be hidden in plain sight.

Do you love rabbits? Are you looking for a password keeper to organize your passwords? Look no further than this disguised password log book!

Bunny Find Your Hoppy: A disguised password book and personal internet address log for rabbit lovers is an bunny themed password book packed with rabbits to put a smile on your face while looking up your passwords.

Available from Amazon at: http://cericlark.com/drump

A bunny password book with a difference

The book is 9 inches high by 6 inches wide to give plenty of space to log all the information you need to get into your internet accounts.

Tabbed pages

Finding your password quickly is important, Bunny is a password book with tabs along the edge of the right page. If you flick the pages, an optical illusion makes it seem like there are paw prints running down the page!

Notes and extra pages

Not everything can be pigeon-holed. This password keeper has several pages in the back to store home network settings, software license information along with notes pages for all that important information that won’t go anywhere else.

What about writing down passwords, is that safe?

This is not just a log book but it contains a short section at the front explaining how to create secure passwords. Storing passwords anywhere can never be completely safe, whether online or on paper but you can do some simple things to make it as safe as it can be which is covered in the book.

Why is there a bunny on the cover? Is it just the cover?

No, this is a bunny themed password book. There are adorable balls of fur throughout the book. The book was originally designed to be disguised as a photo book (and still is), but inside, cuteness abounds because that is what I would like in a password keeper.

Where can I get it?

Bunny can be bought from your local Amazon using this link http://cericlark.com/drump or the direct links to Amazon are:

Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1680630407

Amazon CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/1680630407

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1680630407

Will there be any more themed password books?

Currently, there are four secret password book in the Disguised Password Series called Meow-nificent Kittens, Paws-itively Puppies, Birds and Find your Hoppy! Find them all on Amazon at:

Puppy password book: http://cericlark.com/woof

Kitten password book: http://cericlark.com/meow

Birds password book: http://cericlark.com/Chirp

Bunny/rabbit password book: http://cericlark.com/drump

Meow-nificent Kittens iand Paws-itively Puppies are secret password log books

Birds Password Book: The ‘hidden’ password book!

Birds password book

Birds password book

The birds password book that can be hidden in plain sight.

Do you love birds? Are you looking for a password keeper to organize your passwords? Look no further than this disguised password log book!

Birds A Secret Life: A disguised password book and personal internet address log for bird lovers is an avian themed password book packed with birds to put a smile on your face while looking up your passwords.

Available from Amazon at: http://cericlark.com/chirp 

A birds password log book with a difference

The book is 9 inches high by 6 inches wide to give plenty of space to write all the information you need to get into your internet accounts.

Tabbed pages

Finding your password quickly is important, Birds is a password book with tabs along the edge of the right page. If you flick the pages, an optical illusion makes it seem like there are footprints running down the page!

Notes and extra pages

Not everything can be pigeon-holed (pun intended). This password keeper has several pages in the back to store home network settings, software license information along with notes pages for all that important information that won’t go anywhere else.

What about writing down passwords, is that safe?

This is not just a log book but it contains a short section at the front explaining how to create secure passwords. Storing passwords anywhere can never be completely safe, whether online or on paper but you can do some simpler things to make it as safe as it can be which is covered in the book.

Why is there a bird on the cover? Is it just the cover?

No, this is a bird themed password book. There are adorable feathered friends throughout the book. The book was originally designed to be disguised as a photo book (and still is), but inside, cuteness abounds because that is what I would like in a password keeper.

Where can I get it?

Birds can be bought from your local Amazon using this link http://cericlark.com/chirp or the direct links to Amazon are:

Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1680630393

Amazon CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/1680630393

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1680630393

Will there be any more themed password books?

Currently, there are three more secret password book in the Disguised Password Series called Paws-itively Puppies, Birds and Find your Hoppy! Find them all on Amazon at:

Puppy password book: http://cericlark.com/woof

Kitten password book: http://cericlark.com/meow

Birds password book: http://cericlark.com/Chirp

Bunny/rabbit password book: http://cericlark.com/drump

Meow-nificent Kittens iand Paws-itively Puppies are secret password log books

Cyber crime and hacking from the eyes of the bad guys

Have you ever wanted to know about hacking and cybercrime? Well I’ve been hooked since the eighties although I usually reserve my curiosity for for films and TV programmes with hacking in them.Last week I attended the HP Labs lecture in Bristol about cyber crime. Usually I go to HP Labs lectures for the free food and alcohol at the end (my husband goes for the techie lectures) but since I am up the duff the alcohol has been off limits so it takes a really good lecture to get me interested. This time I wasn’t disappointed.

The talk was presented by James Lyne, the Director of Technology Strategy at Sophos. You can see easily why he has risen so high. His talk was funny, engaging and kept me interested through the whole thing. It wasn’t too dumbed down either but I don’t think he needed to explain what a DDoS attack was – I mean everyone knows what one of those is right? Just please don’t organise one for my tiny insignificant website. You all have bigger fish to fry. He didn’t even plug the Sophos antivirus app which I already had installed on my Android phone. Respect!

It was fascinating to hear about the work they do at Sophos how sometimes they hack the hackers so they can find out from the bad guys what the vulnerabilities are so they can fix them, who then find new ones once they realise they have been fixed and then create new ones, which Sophos then find ‘cures’ for and so on. I could go on all night with that!

He showed us hacking tools he’d ‘stolen’ from the hackers and programmes which he used for his presumably white hat hacking jaunts.

The dangers of Smartphone security

There was a really funny part where he asked what smartphones people had. First he asked about iPhones and a few unsteady hands went up (James, is obviously an Apple fan) and he joked that the pride had gone and they needed to reclaim the coolness. Then he asked about Android users and a whole host of hands shot up, pride beaming out of every Android owning face in the room, including my own. How the world has changed!

The point about the smartphone part of the presentation is that many people think they are safe when using them. He was able to demonstrate just how unsafe they were by snooping using his equipment to find what wifi connections people had looked at even though they weren’t currently connected to any wifi. He said, had he been of the bad guy persuasion then he could have created a wifi connection with the same name as one which your phone had been connected to before, which would mean it would automatically connect without your knowledge and steal some private credential you would rather keep to yourself.

The last few minutes of the lecture were a question and answer session. One question I found fascinating. Which computer operating system would the speaker deem to be most secure? The answer was surprising. He was at pains to point put that if the system was properly configured then he would rank them, Linux, Windows then Mac. Kind of blows your mind away don’t it.

All in all, this was a brilliant lecture which I am so glad I went to. In fact for once the food and drink paled into comparison with the actual talk. Full markes to HP and SOPHOS. Although please HP, could you bring back the goats cheese parcels, those cylindrical dark green things were the worst thing I ever tasted. There is no sauce that could ever improve that! Oh and more variety of non-caffinated or alcohol drinks would be nice. I was stuck with Apple Juice again.

If you are interested in security then the there is a competition he was plugging. It was called Cyber Security Challenge UK. More information can be found at https://cybersecuritychallenge.org.uk/. It is worth doing, you could win training opportunities at Masters level as well as internship places. If I was cleverer I would go for it!

Always keep the key with you…

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

 

Some time ago we had the locks to the library and the computer rooms changed to the same key. Now I think this is stupid for a number of reasons but we won’t go into that. Anyway, all the locks are the same and they gave us one key to hand out to teachers and/or sixth formers who need to use the adjacent computer room.

Each time someone asks for the key we note their name down, smile and give them the key. We then go about our business, content in the knowledge that whoever signed it out is almost guaranteed not to be the person who hands in back in. Still, who are we to argue. I suppose by noting the first person to take the key they can follow a trail…

Back to the story. I was busy sorting out the new stationary I bought for the kids when the DT teacher walks in again after taking the key out only ten minutes before:

“Do you have another key”

I look quizzically at him “Why, what happened to the first one?”

“I was looking for some stragglers when they locked me out from inside the classroom. i can hear them giggling from the corridor.”

I sigh and take my personal set of keys out and walk down to the offending room. I put the key in and try to turn it. It’s stuck! The little so and so’s had left the key in the lock on the other side.

The teacher shrugs and says”Oh well, seems I’ve got a free then” and walks off to the staff room.

…just another day in a school.

A Simpler Guide to the best free Android Apps: 100+ apps to inform, entertain and organise (now on Kindle)

 

Finding useful apps on the marketplace can be daunting. A Simpler Guide to the best free Android Apps is not just a list of over a hundred free Android Apps but contains summaries and a rating system which helps you decide whether you want to download an application or not.

The book covers information on security, how to find more apps and discusses permissions. Each app has either a 0, red or green permissions rating based on the risk level of the permission requested. This means you can see at a glance what the ‘risk’ is and get a feel for what is normal for a particular type of app. These permissions are explained at the beginning of the book to help in any future search in the ever expanding marketplace.

A special section ‘For Children’ contains apps especially suited for younger android users.

This book includes:

PART ONE: INTRODUCTION

How to use this Guide
Rating Systems in this book
Star Rating
Permissions
What are the permissions?
A note about Security
Finding Apps
Apps
Games
My apps
Other ways to search for Apps
AppBrain.com
AndroidZoom.com

PART TWO: APP CATEGORIES

Browsers
Business
Communication
Education
Entertainment
Finance
For Children
Lifestyle
Security
Tools
Travel

Alphabetical list of Apps

A Simpler Guide to the best free Android Apps at Amazon US

A Simpler Guide to the best free Android Apps at Amazon UK