Home library: Storing books with no shelf space

book shelves in a home library

Question about a home library.

Answer based on the Quora question:

What is the best way to organize books if I don’t have a bookshelf?

If there is no shelf space available in your home librasry then sometimes the only way books can be stored is in a box hidden in a cupboard, the garage or even the attic. The question then is how do you find a book once is it is stowed away? Fear not Ceri Clark, former Librarian has the answer.

I used to be the library manager of the Audit Commission which had offices throughout England. There were some books in the office where I worked but there had to be about twenty at the most, the rest were held elsewhere. There was no storage space available at the offices so a former librarian had negotiated a contract to store the books in temperature controlled storage in some mines in Bath. We used the library catalogue in conjunction with some spreadsheets to keep track of the books. Whenever someone wanted a book we were emailed a request by the library catalogue and then we told the people at Restore which box the books were in.

How does this help me store my books in my home library?

I’m glad you asked. The same principles that ran the Audit Commission library can be used for your home library but on a much smaller scale. Say you have 3 boxes filled with fiction and non-fiction books, you can use Calibre (free software downloadable from the internet)  to catalogue your books.

Cataloguing your books is as simple as typing in the barcode into the software and it finding the book information on Amazon or some other database. All you would then need to do is label the boxes something as simple as Box 1, box 2 etc or something more detailed like Non-fiction books. Remember to write the Box number in the notes section in Calibre and voilà, when you search for the book on Calibre, it will tell you which box the book is currently stored in. If you have more than one storage space you can add this information too. For example Box 2, Attic or Box 3, Garage.

Another advantage of using Calibre over say a spreadsheet is that there is a cover flow so you can see at a glance whether the book is the right one. You can also search by tags which will put all the similar books together on one ‘shelf’ so if you are researching a subject and you have a number of books in it you can easily see what you need quickly as if you were browsing a real shelf in your hallway.

I have a chapter in A Simpler Guide to Calibre which goes into detail on how this can be done.

 

see question on quora

ceri's q and a

Q&A My books have gone from Calibre, how do I get them back?

ceri's q and aMy books have gone, how do I get them back? A quick tip from A Simpler Guide to Calibre.

A Simpler Guide to Calibre
A Simpler Guide to Calibre, available as an ebook or paperback from Amazon.

It can happen that when you first load Calibre your books all seemed to have disappeared. This is usually because the software has been told your e-books library has moved to a different folder and is now pointing to the wrong place. This has happened to me during upgrades for example. Another reason may be that a special file called metadata.db (which is in the folder where your books are stored) has been deleted or corrupted. You will either need to tell Calibre where your books really are or rebuild the f
ile that is missing.

If your library has moved

Find the Calibre Library icon/logo (as seen below), then choose Switch/create library.

Switching to a Calibre library

Click on the little picture to the right of the box to browse your computer for the folder you just created and ignore the already checked Use the previously existing library at the new location and click OK. Your books should now reappear.

If the file metadata.db has been moved or corrupted

If you cannot find a file named metadata.db in the top folder where your library is located on your computer, it has been deleted. You may also encounter problems if it has been corrupted in some way. To fix this:

  1. First right-click on the Calibre icon in the Calibre toolbar (as above) and choose Library maintenance.
  2. Select Restore database and Calibre will rebuild the metadata.db file.

ceri's q and a

Top 10 of the greatest books to read before you die – and they are free…

people reading on booksI’ve got my librarian’s hat on for this post. To celebrate the publication of my A Simpler Guide to Finding Free eBooks, I decided at 1 in the morning to write a post about the top 10 books to read before you die that are available for free. Little did I know it would take hours to compile and format! Still, the list below are novels you should at least take a look at with links to Amazon and the Gutenberg Project. While you can only get Kindle versions from Amazon, you will be able to download other types of e-books from the Gutenberg Project and of course they are free.

Here are my top ten picks:

1. Far from the Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy

One of the first and best romance novels of all time. Set in the 19th century by a writer from the 19th century, this is a read you won’t want to miss.

Get it now as:

AMAZON BUTTONGUTENBERG BUTTON

2. Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Rags to riches and unrequited love, this book has it all from the writer of Oliver Twist.

AMAZON BUTTON GUTENBERG BUTTON

 

3. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë

Another classic romance, boy meets girl, girl falls in love with boy, split up, then get together again but this is one of the first novels and one of the best (or it wouldn’t be in this list!) Worth a look.

AMAZON BUTTONGUTENBERG BUTTON

4. The Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde

I read this story when I was about ten years old. This completely freaked me out as a child and so I recommend it for the next generation! Dorian Gray is a handsome man who sells his soul for eternal youth. He doesn’t lead a good life and there are consequences…

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5. The Mill on the Floss – George Elliot

This is a fast paced love story from the Victorian era. This is a tragedy so have a box of tissues ready.

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6. Pride & Prejudice – Jane Austen

Ah, Mr Darcy. Who hasn’t heard of the hero of this romance? This is the original of the  often repeated tale of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy.

AMAZON BUTTON GUTENBERG BUTTON

 

7. The Fall of the House of Usher & other stories – Edgar Allen Poe

An old crumbling, evil house, a sick relative, a death, this is a gothic horror which builds on previous horrors to a new level. The links below take you to the Works of Edgar Allan Poe, volume 2 but this is the book you are looking for.

AMAZON BUTTON GUTENBERG BUTTON

 

8. Vanity Fair – William Thackeray

Vanity fair is the opposite to the Brontës, as in don’t expect the straight happy ending. It is a more complex read but well worth it.

AMAZON BUTTON GUTENBERG BUTTON

9. Moby Dick – Hermann Melville

The hunt for Moby Dick has fascinated readers for generations. Will it captivate you?

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10. Woman in White – Wilkie Collins

The last entry in this blog post is a mystery. This is one of the first detective novels ever written and if you like the Mystery genre you’ll want to see how it all began. Even if you don’t normally like Victorian literature you might be pleasantly surprised with this one.

AMAZON BUTTON GUTENBERG BUTTON

THE Carnegie Event

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

Carnegie Medal time has arrived again. While this does enable me to have two days out of the library it also means a small amount of stress organising the trip.

I should explain what we do to shadow the Carnegie Awards here. Well as you know there are seven books on the shortlist this year. We have to select seven pupils – one for each book and take them over to a school where each kid designs (with 12 other kids from other schools) a play based on the books. The next day they perform it at a local theatre with authors and dignitaries judging.

This year is easier and yet harder at the same time for me. The event cincidentally occurs in Activities week in our school so most of the children are on other school trips abroad. The ones that stay behind have to help with ecoschools and from what I gather it basically means cleaning the school up!

Anyway so I have a finite group to choose from (some I won’t touch with a barge pole but some are great) Unfortunately I may have to choose some of the first group to go with me. Woe is me.

The budget is also a bit of a problem at the moment. It’s at the end of the year and the accounts department get a bit ancy about spending money (even though I have enough in my budget!

The other librarians I’m told usually buy three books of each of the shortlisted titles. They then get the children to write reviews on each one and choose the best. I can’t afford to do this so I’ve got them telling me their first, second and third choice and pulling their names out of a hat so I only have to buy one of each.

Then it’s actually getting them to want to go. A couple were like “yeah yeah, I really want to go. Can I go? please, please, I’ll be good!” Others were like “um, I’ll have to tink about it, what else is going on that week?”

Interestingly enough when I mention that the alternative is to pick up litter in the school, they become strangely interested…

Just another school book fair

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

From World Book Day I have ben presiding over our second book fair since joining my school. I got to tell you – its no picnic.

First day we did it (6 March) was a preview day so we just had to worry about setting up but even that day had its problems. As you know from reading this blog, the daily baby-sitting session known as prep is in the library. So try to imagine keeping 45 kids quiet with all those shiny new books just begging to be picked up and oohed and aahed over. Needless to say I failed.

Day two, we decided to make break for reservatios only as it is only for fifteen minutes. We’re librarians not mathematicians – you try working out the cost of several books, with a voucher nad answering questions while making sure they don’t destroy any more books than you can prevent! If you are wondering we got that down to one. They took out toy bits from one book and put the on a different shelf. Aargh.

Lunchtime arrives, hordes of kids descend on us, all asking for their reservaions, to buy other books. oh and “Miss, I don’t want that book now, can I have this one.” Yeah if you can do the maths for me, Of course I don’t say that, I just smile sweetly and say “yes”, getting out the calculator.

So there we were, about ten kids in my queue and ten kids in my assistant’s. …and the book fair people call. I mean they were calling a library in a school. Is calling at lunchtime a really sensible thing to do to get on the librarian’s good side? hmm. Finally get her off the line with non-committal answers and get back to to the hordes. Ten minutes later, 2 o’clcck and bliss. We’ve stil got two more days of this…

 

Librarians writing books…

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

Apparently from various forums I have been reading, getting feedback from children from a book you are writing is pointless but still, I work in a school and I know quite a few good readers who like fantasy books, the genre I wrote my story in. …so I took the opportunity.

I gave the story to a couple of 11-12 year olds (year 7), the funny thing is, I never tend to see these two girls – only during Prep. I thought If I gave it to these ones then they wouldn’t see me all the time and feel pressurised into telling me what they think.

With this in mind I stayed away from the girls purposely. Except that one of the girls nagged me incessantly if she could finish it during prep on my computer. When she said she stayed up to four hours to read the book the night before, I felt so flattered I let her.

Not so good for me though as that was MY computer and I couldn’t do any work. On the other hand I justified to myself, I never get any work done during Prep anyway – most of the time is spent patrolling and yelling at people to be quiet.

So that was before half-term. I got some lovely feedback from her. I tried to ask her if the ending was too sudden or did she want more description but no she loved it all – You got to love her.

I didn’t see the other one until the end of last week – although I gave her the book at the same time. the great thing was I didn’t go up to her – she came bounding up to me saying she liked it.

Wonderful, I now just need to actually finish it. The story is finished but It needs editing. The problem is I keep getting nagged by the first girl when I am going to right the sequel… Aargh there is not enough hours in the day…

 

A day in the life of a busy School Librarian

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

I’ve had a monster day today so I thought I would write it all down to see if I actually achieved anything!

8.30

  • Go straight up to the library. I haven’t got time for the staff meeting today.
  • Put all the extra missing things the cleaner found in the lost property box and the books back on the shelves (Will kids ever learn to put things away?).
  • Put computer on
  • Put the other computers on + photocopier/printer
  • Unlock all doors
  • The computer finally has the log on screen. Log in.
  • Wait another five minutes for the screen to come to life.
  • Open Thunderbird. Swear under breathe as computer takes another five minutes to open it.
  • Get a couple of books to catalogue and open Firefox because our catalogue freezes in Internet Explorer.
  • Let the little darlings into the library.
  • Sort out riddle of the day.
  • Ring up accounts to order new chairs for the library. Get told that I need to provide an estimate of the library’s value by the end of the morning.
  • Save the cataloguing done so far and put to one side.
  • Do some photocopying for the children/teachers.
  • Open up evaluation already started by pure luck. Aargh its break-time.

11.00

  • Shout at children not to run in the library as they try to grab a computer.
  • Listen to inane but faintly amusing conversation about girl’s pet horse. Smile politely and try to sneakily to do a bit more on the valuation while they are not looking.
  • A girl wants to take out the Jane Austen Emma DVD. These come in pairs and I don’t allow them to take more than one DVD at a time. Especially as a really expensive one has been ‘mislaid’ lately. Spend five minutes searching for said DVD. Under the shelf, on the shelf, on the desk, in the box. To be told, “you mean the one the other librarian put in the box ready up there?” Grrr
  • Check out/check in about 10 books.
  • Accept donations for the library by one of the pupils
  • Shout at the kids break is nearly over. (They can’t tell the time by themselves.)

11.20

  • Peace at last. Finish evaluation – pat myself on back.
  • Rush to loo – am desperate by this time.
  • Send valuation to accounts with instructions to order chairs and get quote for other thing. There are three things in that email.
  • Ring up to check they’ve got it. Yep, but forgot about the stuff that belongs to other departments which they’ve dumped in the library storage room.
  • He deletes e-mails and tells me to send it again – except there was other stuff on there!
  • Finish valuation and send it off making sure the other stuff is on separate e-mails. I’m not checking to see if he’s got it – too much to do.
  • More people come in and ask me to do photocopying.
  • Enquiry to find out if we have a book. It is very urgent. They need it for coursework. Not in library. OK will order.
  • Processed books for teacher who wanted books urgently. Stamped and covered them.
  • More photocopying
  • Put an order together for some more books – tunnels, the looking glass wars etc and sent it off. Processed purchase order etc.
  • Put some memos together telling teachers of new additions in the library relevant to their departments
  • Process some invoices of books that arrived yesterday.

12.00

  • Assistant arrives. Woohooo – LUNCH
  • Drop off post in teachers pigeon holes at lunch while looking at Softlink catalogue and eating hurriedly and sneaking a peak at the Times.
  • Received another book package.

12.15

  • Back in library
  • Open up book package
  • Process invoice. i.e. stamp, put date on, photocopy, put arrival on computer
  • Check event is on later.
  • Ring up another school to confirm attendance at Carnegie Shadowing event in April.

1.00

  • Juniors come in
  • Check in and check out books
  • Reply to enquiry regarding Barrington Stoke books. Get really annoyed because the teacher doesn’t want to do any work and tries to get me to do everything! Her excuse is she works part-time. well join the club! So do I but I don’t fob off my work to others. I already made a leaflet for her telling her what books we had relevant for her subject. What does she want from me? Blood?
  • Allow Seniors to come in early because the library will be closed earlier because of the ‘event.’
  • Talk to teacher about world book day and get distracted by another teacher demanding attention.
  • The gigglers come in but are remarkably restrained. They are really nice kids when they are not trying to be annoying. …and by trying to be annoying I mean making funny noises and asking “Is that annoying?” They still require my attention though 🙁

2.00

  • Assistant goes to lunch
  • I show six former new book I bought which is relevant to her subject area. She takes it away to look at it and then borrows it. Oops, maybe I should have shown it to the teachers first. Never mind I do tend to get too excited about new books.
  • Quick chat to catch up on what happened during the day with assistant and the last shift.

2.30

  • Toddle off to catch the bus. Gosh I am KNACKERED.

 

It just warms the cockles of my heart…

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

At lunchtime today, I had a mass of juniors flood in. This doesn’t panic me as much as the seniors do. They are smaller, cuter and much better behaved than the seniors. A group of year 6 (ten/eleven year old) boys walked through the double doors at the library entrance, pausing at the desk and headed straight for the non-fiction bookshelves in an arrow formation. I swear I watched in open-mouthed amazement and glee. My and my assistant’s heads followed (in unison) their progress with sheer disbelief. The sound of the dambusters music here would not have gone amiss. They were looking for the answer  to the daily riddle in the bookshelves.

My work here is done. The pinnacle of librarianship has now been achieved. What can be more difficult than getting a child to use the Dewey Decimal system without being asked! – independant learning at its best. If I was only thirty years older I could retire in happiness.

Classic Collections

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. Posts may be edited from the original blog. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

The problem with budgets is that they go up as well as down. This year our book budget went down considerably so I have to find ways of making it go that little bit further.

My latest find was from the book people. I managed to get 10 books for just shy of a tenner. Have a look at the BookPeople website at: http://www.thebookpeople.co.uk

These are brilliant. All our classics are looking a bit dated and as my previous blogs show the kids at my school are really picky. I hadn’t seen one ‘classic’ taken out by the younger years since I’ve been there. The sixth formers do but they have to for their A levels.

Anyway, I bought this set of books which are really colourful and a joy to look at. They fit nicely in the hand and the type face is a comfortable size to read. There was:

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Flambards by K.M.Peyton
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Anne of Green Gables by L.M.Montgomery
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Party Shoes by Noel Streatfeild and
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

I had just emptied the box set into our cataloguing box yesterday (I loved the box it came in and thought I could use it for something else) when the little darlings spotted the box and asked me to get one of the books pictured on it. Well of course I went, ‘we’ve got them – that’s why the box is there.’ I am my own worst enemy sometimes. I should have said I would see thereby giveing me time to catalogue them.

Anyway they saw me glance at the box we were keeping them in and before you can say, lots of classics to read, they were rummaging in there and reading the blurbs at the back. The up shot of this little escapade was my long suffering assistant had to catalogue them all this morning in a rush. By the time I got in some of the classics were already taken out! The girl I was taking about took out Flambards. Aargh, my planned display ruined!

I’m not sure who won that one. I think I’ll call it a draw.

 

eww public libraries – just kidding!

I have decided to repost some of my old blog posts from the distant past when I was working as a School Librarian. Kids do the funniest things and I really enjoyed working in a school. May be edited from the original post. So this is part of a series from my old Batty Librarian Blog…

I visited my local public library and while its not as bad as the kids’ parents told me, there wasn’t a huge selection of fiction books on offer. We have more books in our spinners! Still I liked their what’s new section (had six books in it which weren’t actually that new), there was a book displayed there which looked quite interesting – I think I’m going to buy it.

I think they could’ve done more really. It was all a bit bland apart from the toddler reading bit which was basically a play area in the middle of it. There were no posters advertising forthcoming books or even what they have that might be interesting. I always insist on havin fresh displays every term in my library. it felt a bit oppressive to tell you the truth. It’s visits like that that make me appreciate how nice my library actually is.

It’s daunting seeing a lot of books with just their spines showing – you need to attract the reader – tease them with colour. Dare I say it – break it up a bit.

The staff were friendly and welcoming, I’ll give them that. They don’t give phone numbers out though – strange policy – do they think I’m going to sell it on the black market for library phone numbers?

hey ho

Lending ebooks through Amazon – oh the unfairness of it all!

In the US, (and I am not sure where else), if you buy a book from Amazon there is every reason to believe that you can lend it to a deserving friend., what other kind of friend would you lend your books too?

Unfortunately this is not the case in the UK and possible South Africa, I have a friend there.

If you bought a book from Amazon, all you do is go to the Amazon book page and click the link on the top of the page to lend the book, Your friend will then have two weeks to read it. Sounds simple, don’t it (bad grammar deliberate). If you want more details on how to do this Johanna Garth has a great blog post explaining how to lend them to your friends at: http://www.johannagarth.com/2012/01/shared-good-book-lately.html

Well I can’t do that and I feel left out. I’m the girl sulking in the corner of the party, nursing a gin and tonic looking at the floor, whilst everyone is partying like its 1999 (erm 2012) in the center.

On Facebook, there is a group called SOS, Share our Stories. Its all promoted by Fantasy Island Book Publishing (FIBP) to promote the lending program. After all authors just want their books to be read. Authors are freely lending their copies of other author#s books within the program, unless they are currently reading them.

I think it is about time that Amazon opened up the Kindle Lending Library to the rest of the world or at least the UK! We like to read too and there is a great vampire novel I KNOW my friend will love.

Here’s hoping 2012 will be the year of the Kindle Library.

C’mon Amazon don’t leave us inthe corner…

 

 

Crash Course for making print book cover designs for CreateSpace

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000446_00066]

If you are a budding self-publisher you’ve probably heard of CreateSpace. They do have cover creators in their book making process but it is nice to have something original that you have made yourself. This is a crash course which by it’s very nature can’t give you the ins and outs but does give you helpful tips and the principles for making a great design.

First you need to download a template from CreateSpace at:

https://www.createspace.com/Help/Book/Artwork.do This means all the margins, dimensions and bleeds are done for you.

To-do this you need to have a few basic details.

  • Interior Type: Black and White
  • Trim Size: 5.5 x 8.5 (the size of your book).
  • Number of pages: ? (how many pages will your book be once it is completed. Remember it is very important as your images will have to compensate for a reduced or increased spine size).
  • Paper Colour: Cream (thicker paper as well as more yellowy paper. Also note that some people with dyslexia read easier on cream paper.)

Note, if you put say 312 pages in, the file you actually download may say 320 pages. This is because of the bleed size. (They cut bits off the end of the printing process).

Once you have your template, open it in a graphics programme. This can be Gimp or Photoshop or some other flavour.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000446_00066]

It is very important you rename the first layer, template. The next thing you have to do is create a new layer. Don’t do anything to the first/template layer. Just make sure that it is at the top of your layer list. This way you can toggle the view off and on so you can see how your design will fit on the printed paperback. I’ve given you an example of how I did it on the left.

Put your background pictures on the new layer.

Explanation of DPI. Your images MUST be 300 dpi for printed book covers. They also HAVE to be at least 8.5 INCHES high (if that is the size of your book).. I have been sent 300dpi images which are only a few centimeters big. The best way to explain why this is unsuitable is to imagine you are holding a piece of material about 2cm by 2cms with a picture on it. Now try to stretch that piece of material up to 8 inches. That picture is looking a bit stretched now isn’t it? It physically cannot be done without the picture suffering badly and when it is printed it will look awful.

Once you have put your background images in you can bring the template higher up the layers list so you can see which bits of your beautiful cover will be chopped off. Adjust as necessary. Remember to delete the template or move it below all the other layers when you have finished.

Put your text on and save. Voila you now have a cover.

 

The Woodcutter by Kate Danley

I read this book while holidaying in Cypress. I finished it in two days which is a reflection of how good it is. I can spend months reading a book I’m not keen on and have been known to cheekily take a sneak peak at Wikipedia for the synopsis to bluff my way through a Reading Group evening….

The story was beautifully written and at one point I thought to myself it was like poetry. I’m not a fan of poetry normally but the way the story unfolded evoked emotions and reveries which added to the ambience.

The Woodcutter is the guardian of the Wood. He is a powerful man who doesn’t seem to covet power – he does what he must. An evil queen is trying to take over the twelve kingdoms and he is the only person who can stop her.

From Snow White to Baba Yaga to Odin, the tale covers many legends and fairy stories of yore. The main characters are fleshed out, the Woodcutters wife waiting at home the only thing keeping him going at times. It blends them to a perfect mix which I thoroughly enjoyed.

I’m now looking forward to the next book…

Amazon discussions – Fantasy book club: http://www.amazon.com/forum/fantasy/ref=cm_cd_pg_pg1?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=FxRHP2KEWXI0H1&cdPage=1&cdSort=oldest&cdThread=Tx2S3FAMAQ54V47

October 2011 -Kate Danley –The Woodcutter
November 2011 -Martin T Ingham –The Rogue Investigations
December 2011 -Richard Bacon –Sinderella – The True Legend
January 2012 -J. R. Tomlin –Wings of Evil
February 2012 – Triune – Willow Poison by Triune
March 2012 -Diane Jones –Demonspell (Sunspinners)
April 2012 – Alison Deluca – The Night Watchman Express
June 2012 – Danielle Raver – Brother, Betrayed
July 2012 -David N Alderman -Black Earth: End of the Innocence:
August 2012 -Andrea K Hosth -Champion of the Rose (Darest)
September 2012 -J. Dean -The Summoning of Clade Josso: The first descent into the Vein
October 2012 – Gary Hoover – Land of Nod, The Artifact
November 2012 -James M. Vargo -Passage of the Acolyte, Part One
December 2012 -Heather C. Hudak -Breathless (The Cordelia Chronicles)
January 2013 -Patti Roberts -Paradox – The Angels Are Here
February 2013 -Muto Michelle -The Book of Lost Souls
March 2013 -Erick Flaig -Call Me Ishmael
April 2013 -Jeremy Johnson -The Legendiers and the Battle of Darkness
May 2013 -Theresa Henson -Shift: A Novel
June 2013 -Chris Howard -Saltwater Witch (Book #1 of The Seaborn Trilogy)(Book #1 of The Seaborn Trilogy)
July 2013 -Ed Gregory -As Shadows Wait (The Dayshadow Trilogy)
August 2013 -Edward W. Robertson -The White Tree
September 2013 -JS Laurenz -To Conquer the Heart of a King
October 2013 -Jeffrey Joslin -The Twilight of Miogaror: Part I
November 2013 -Jon Rosenberg -The Unicorn Crisis (The Hidden Academy)
December 2013 -Brendan Connell -The Translation of Father Torturo
January 2014 -Michael Waterhouse -Dustin Anfeald And The Vail (Anfealds World)
February 2014 -MJ Holmes -Tyme and Yon Serpent (Serpent’s Tail)
March 2014 -R.K. Finnell -Kickshaw Candies
April 2014 -Ceri Clark -Children of the Elementi special edition

 

For more great books check out Fantasy Island Book Publishers website for these great books:

Terps by Elaine Gannon

The Rose Tower by Connie J. Jasperson

After Ilium by S. M. Swartz

Children of the Elementi by Ceri Clark

Emeline and the Muntant by Rachel Tsoumbakos

Miranda Warning by Marilyn Rucker Norrod

Brother, Betrayed by Danielle Raver

Ednor Scardens by Kathleen Barker

Land Of Nod, The Artifact by Gary Hoover

Losing Beauty by Johanna Garth

The King Of Egypt by J. J. Makins

The Last Good Knight by Connie J. Jasperson

The Night Watchman Express by Alison DeLuca

Black Numbers by Dean Frank Lappi

The Lollipop Club by J. Darroll Hall

http://fantasyislandbookpublishing.com/

Visit them now, you won’t be disappointed!

Samsung Galaxy Tab for Writing

I’ve recently bought the Galaxy Tab 10.1. I primarily bought this as a reading device but I wanted something that wasn’t too heavy but which I could write on.

Hardware:

  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 (running Android with ADW)
    Samsung bluetooth keyboard case (the official one)

I can’t praise the tablet enough. I wanted something that was flexible, with a good battery life and which was light enough to carry oround. I usually charge the tablet every couple of days and I am an intensive user!

The tablet is light and if don’t want to use the keyboard for any reason I can hold it one-handed for a loooooonnnng time. 😉

The keyboard is also just what I need. It isn’t noisy and while it is heavier than a rubberised bluetooth keyboard it is nicer to use. It feels like a quality product and has all the features I need.

Software

The tablet comes with Polaris Office. This is amazing. I am using it to write the second book in the Elerian Chronicles (Elementi).

I save it as an Office document format and back it up to my Skydrive using Sorami. I know with Docs to Go I can back it up to Google (I also have this)  but I rather use Skydrive for my writing. I do find it frustratng that you can only back up files to Box.net with Polaris but I hope this will improve with time. May be they will do some sort of sync option?

For those who are short sighted like me, you can increase the font on Polaris to 200%! Simply reflow the text and you can edit in comfort.

Of course the question now is do I really need a laptop now my Samsung is so good?

Time will tell…

Add books to your Author Central Profile

I was asked by a friend how to add their books to their Amazon Author Profile. I thought possibly there may be others who may not know how to do this so I am giving back to the community with this blog post.

To add books to your Author Central profile (works on both .com and .co.uk sites):

  • Sign in to Author Central.
  • Click on Books
  • Go to the bottom of the page where it says Are we missing a book?
  • Click the yellow button which says add more books
  • A list of books will appear with your author name in it. There is a button under each book. If it yours and you haven’t clicked on it yet it will be yellow. Click on it.

If the book isn’t there check how your name is spelt on the book on your Amazon page. If it is different from the one in the search box on the Amazon Central Books page type in the variant spelling. You should be able to find all your books this way.